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Press Release - 2018 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — “My Favorite Thing is Monsters” by Emil Ferris, published by Fantagraphics Books, has won the 2018 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year. Penn State University Libraries sponsors the juried annual award and its administrator, the Pennsylvania Center for the Book.

“Part horror, part mystery, part transmuted memoir, ‘My Favorite Thing is Monsters’ resolutely rejects to settle into a particular genre,” the jury said. “This book is a masterwork as determined as its young protagonist to reveal the truth of our sad, misguided, cruel and yet tender species. Its layout defies most comics norms to create a … unique visual experience: a dialogic space for readers to affectively engage with social commentary while witnessing Karen Reyes’ inner and outer worlds as they collapse into each other. The pages of ‘Monsters’ perhaps are to comics paneling what poetry is to prose, and are richly drawn as crosshatched illustrations in ball-point pen, with stylistic nods to film noir, horror magazines and museum art.”

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or nonfiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. or Canadian citizen or resident. It honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to Penn State’s University Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels: “Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.”

Ferris will receive $2,500 and a two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America at a ceremony this fall at Pattee and Paterno Library on Penn State’s University Park campus.

The jury also awarded two honor books: “Eartha” by Cathy Malkasian, published by Fantagrahics Books, and “Hostage” by Guy Delisle, published by Drawn & Quarterly. The jury said, “ ‘Eartha’ immerses readers into the … fictional world of Echo Fjord, a haven for unfinished dreams that float there from the dystopian-hued ‘City Across the Sea.’ A fun, fable-like parable about our own greedy, information-saturated world, ‘Eartha’ — both the book and main character — offers readers a temporary reprieve from cynicism by providing a powerful reminder of humankind’s capacity for kindness and love.”

“Hostage” follows Christophe André, a Doctors without Borders worker who is captured in 1997 by Chechen rebels in Russia. The jury said Delisle “masterfully captures the banality and frustration of captivity along with all of the fears and small victories,” and that “ ‘Hostage’ is a meditation on darkness and light, inhumanity and compassion, hopelessness and faith.”

The Lynd Ward Prize 2018 selection jury included Penn State academic department representatives who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as Penn State alumni and student representatives with graphic novel expertise:

  • Camila Gutierrez, a Penn State doctoral candidate in comparative literature, focuses on research involving traditions of Anglo comics, Japanese manga and Latin American historieta as observed from East/West and North/South comparative perspectives;
  • Paul Karasik, author and cartoonist from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, with David Mazzucchelli adapted Paul Auster’s novel “City of Glass,” named one of the Best Comics of the 20th Century by The Comics Journal, and with Mark Newgarden co-authored “How To Read Nancy,” a recently published lexicon of the language of comics through the deconstruction of a single comic strip from Aug. 8, 1959, among other works;
  • Lars Stoltzfus-Brown, a Penn State doctoral candidate in mass communications, studies comics and adaptations using intersectional feminist political economy, which explores how comics portray gender, race and sexuality as well as tensions between comics creators and corporate entities through time;
  • Matt Tucker, a Penn State undergraduate student in the College of Information Sciences and Technology, enjoys learning about different cultures through graphic novels; and
  • Joseph Michael Valente, author, associate professor of education and co-director of Penn State’s Center for Disability Studies, wrote “d/Deaf and d/Dumb: A Portrait of a Deaf Kid as a Young Superhero,” published in 2011 by Peter Lang, and developed and taught the special topics course “Mutant Methodology: Graphic Novels as a Research Medium.”

The Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, encourages Pennsylvania’s citizens and residents to study, honor, celebrate and promote books, reading, libraries and literacy. In addition to the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, it also administers the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry AwardPublic Poetry ProjectLetters about LiteratureA Baker’s Dozen: The Best Children’s Books for Family LiteracyPoems from Life; and the interactive Literary & Cultural Heritage Map of Pennsylvania.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2019 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Ellysa Cahoy at ellysa@psu.edu or 814-865-9696, or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book’s website.

 

Press Release - 2017 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

SHORT SUMMARY FOR PENN STATE NEWS / TODAY:

“Rolling Blackouts: Dispatches from Turkey, Syria, and Iraq” by Sarah Glidden has won the 2017 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year. Penn State University Libraries sponsors the juried award and its administrator, the Pennsylvania Center for the Book.

HEADLINE:

 ‘Rolling Blackouts’ wins 2017 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — “Rolling Blackouts: Dispatches from Turkey, Syria and Iraq” by Sarah Glidden, published by Drawn & Quarterly, has won the 2017 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year. Penn State University Libraries sponsors the juried award and its administrator, the Pennsylvania Center for the Book.

“Part memoir, part travel log, ‘Rolling Blackouts’ is the true story of Sarah Glidden, a cartoonist, accompanying two journalists and a former Marine to Turkey, Syria and Iraq to research the effects of the Iraq War on the Middle East. Yet it is also more than Glidden’s story — ‘Rolling Blackouts’ is ultimately the story of the political officials, civilians and refugees there,” the jury said. “Her book brings her readers to the front lines of war in the Middle East and leads them through the thicket of obstacles journalists encounter to get their story with storytelling that is intimate, engaging and frequently humorous. The images welcome the reader into the complex, many-layered world of the Middle East, and Glidden is a terrific guide.”

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or nonfiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. or Canadian citizen or resident. It honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to Penn State’s University Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels: “Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.”

Glidden will receive $2,500 and a two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America at a ceremony this fall at Pattee Library and Paterno Library on Penn State’s University Park campus.

The jury also awarded two honor books: “Cousin Joseph” by Jules Feiffer, published by Liveright Publishing, and “Hot Dog Taste Test,” by Lisa Hanawalt, also published by Drawn & Quarterly. About “Cousin Joseph” the jury said, “Feiffer portrays an important part of American history — anti-union sentiments and the fear of socialists in Hollywood creating films that would shift our culture to the left — one that feels relevant in today’s political climate. It’s a captivating story meshed with gorgeous ink-washed drawings done in Feiffer's characteristic wobbly, lively line.”

Regarding “Hot Dog Taste Test,” the jury said, “Hilarious, quirkily drawn and often musing about taboo topics, Lisa Hanawalt's ‘Hot Dog Taste Test’ is a deliciously amusing read. The author skips from subject to subject in a frenetic, hyper sprint that very much simulates our nanosecond culture,” concluding that it is “a laugh-out-loud celebration of individuality and the goofy everyday thoughts that we tend to keep private.”

The Lynd Ward Prize 2017 selection jury included Penn State academic department representatives who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as Penn State alumni and student representatives with graphic novel expertise:

  • Amy Madison, adult services librarian at Schlow Centre Region Library, State College, Pa., and co-organizer of BookFest PA;
  • Stephanie Orme, doctoral candidate in communications, Penn State. She studies comic books from a feminist media studies approach, which involves examining how gender, race and sexuality intersect with comic book fandom and comic books as texts;
  • Jessica Sensenig, Penn State sophomore student majoring in English and telecommunications, Chambersburg, Pa. She has a strong appreciation for the interplay of words and images used in graphic novels;
  • Emily Steinberg, painter and graphic novelist, Philadelphia. She also teaches courses on painting and the graphic novel at Penn State Abington; and
  • John C. Weaver, English teacher, Williamsport High School, Williamsport, Pa., who has been using comics in his classroom for 15 years. He also has published and presented on the use of comics in the classroom.

The Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, encourages Pennsylvania’s citizens and residents to study, honor, celebrate and promote books, reading, libraries and literacy. In addition to the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, it also administers the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award, whose 2017 winner was announced Feb. 14; the Public Poetry Project, whose 2017 featured poets will offer a reading on April 20; Letters about Literature; A Baker’s Dozen: The Best Children’s Books for Family Literacy; and the interactive Literary & Cultural Heritage Map of Pennsylvania.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2018 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Ellysa Cahoy at ellysa@psu.edu or 814-865-9696, or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book’s website at https://pabook.libraries.psu.edu/awards-contests/lynd-ward-graphic-novel-prize-introduction.

Media contact:

Jill Shockey, Manager, Public Relations and Marketing Penn State University Libraries, 515 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802-1812, jss140@psu.edu; 814-863-4240.

 

 

2016 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

Penn State announces winner of the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Penn State’s University Libraries and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book are pleased to announce that “Unflattening” by Nick Sousanis, published by Harvard University Press, has won the 2016 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year.

 “‘Unflattening,’” the jury noted, “is an innovative, multi-layered graphic novel about comics, art and visual thinking. The book’s ‘integrated landscape’ of image and text takes the reader on an Odyssean journey through multiple dimensions, inviting us to view the world from alternate visual vantage points. These perspectives are inspired by a broad range of ideas from astronomy, mathematics, optics, philosophy, ecology, art, literature, cultural studies and comics. The graphic styles and layouts in this work are engaging and impressive and succeed in making the headiest of ideas accessible. In short, ‘Unflattening’  takes sequential art to the next level. It takes graphic narrative into the realm of theory, and it puts theory into practice with this artful presentation of how imaginative thinking can enrich our understanding of the world.”

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to Penn State’s University Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels: “Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.”

Sponsored by Penn State’s University Libraries and administered by the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or nonfiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. or Canadian citizen or resident. A $2,500 prize and a two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America will be presented to Nick Sousanis at a ceremony at Penn State University in the fall.

The jury also awarded two honor books: “Displacement,” by Lucy Knisley, published by Fantagraphics, and “Russian Olive to Red King,” by Kathryn Immonen and Stuart Immonen, published by AdHouse Books. About “Displacement,” the jury said, “Lucy Knisley's ‘Displacement’ is a perfect memoir comic. Her vibrant watercolor illustration humanizes the reality of caring for loved ones as they age with candor and grace. The narrative of her grandfather’s journal from World War II woven in with harrowing cruise experiences is a crucial touchstone, reminding us that her grandparents are so much more than what they can express to the outside world in the present.”

About “Russian Olive to Red King,” the jury said, “Kathryn and Stuart Immonen’s  ‘Russian Olive to Red King’ is that rare work of fine art that succeeds at cross-purposes; it is both successfully avant-garde and profoundly relatable. Stuart’s light, clean and deliberate artistic choices are the ideal counterpoint to Kathryn’s searing and devastating story of loss and grief, all of which leads to the novel’s formally upsetting and innovative coda.”

The selection jury had representatives from various Penn State academic departments who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as representatives with graphic novel expertise from among Penn State’s alumni and students.

The following comprise the selection jury for the 2016 prize:

  • Chair John McComas has a bachelor of arts degree in English from Penn State, and puts his 20-year “fascination for all facets of the comics medium” to good use as a full-time staffer at the Comic Swap in State College, Pa.;
  • Kendra Boileau is editor-in-chief of the Penn State University Press and the acquiring editor for the Press’ graphic medicine book series;
  • Collin Colsher of Brooklyn, N.Y., is creator of the “Real Batman Chronology Project,” and has a master of arts degree in cinema studies from NYU;
  • Dustin Perna is an undergraduate student at Penn State majoring in advertising and public relations with a fervent interest in comics and graphic novels; and
  • Beth Theobald is a reference and instruction librarian at Penn State’s Beaver campus.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2017 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Ellysa Cahoy at ellysa@psu.edu or 814-865-9696, or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book website:

https://pabook.libraries.psu.edu/awards-contests/lynd-ward-graphic-novel...

Editor’s contact: Jill Shockey, Manager Libraries Publications and Public Relations, Penn State University Libraries, 515 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802-1812, jss140@psu.edu; 814-863-4240.

2015 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

Penn State announces winner of the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

University Park, PA--Penn State’s University Libraries and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book are pleased to announce that “This One Summer ” by Mariko Tamaki (writer) and Jillian Tamaki (artist), published by First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, has won the 2015 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year.

“It’s an honor to have this book recognized and we are thrilled to accept,” said co-creators Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki. “Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki are major talents, and it’s wonderful that the power of their work is resonating across the whole literary landscape,” says Mark Siegel, editorial director of First Second.

“This One Summer,” says the jury, “is a beautifully drawn, keenly observed story. It is told with a fluid line and a sensitive eye to the emblematic moments that convey character, time, and place—the surf at night, the sound of flip-flops, a guarded sigh—all at the meandering pace of a summer’s vacation. The Tamakis astutely orchestrate the formal complexities of the graphic novel in the service of an evocative, immersive story. At first blush a coming of age story centered on two young girls, the book belongs equally to all its cast of characters, any of whom feel realized enough to have supported a narrative in their own right. Striking, relatable, and poignant, this graphic novel lingers with readers long after their eyes have left the pages.”

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to Penn State's University Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels: “Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.”

Sponsored by Penn State's University Libraries and administered by the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or non-fiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. or Canadian citizen or resident. Mariko and Jillian Tamaki will share a cash prize of $2,500, and will each receive a two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America and a framed commemorative presented at a ceremony at Penn State University in the fall.

The jury also awarded one honor book: “Here,” by Richard McGuire and published by Pantheon Books, a division of Random House. Of “Here" the jury says, “Making literal the idiom ‘if these walls could
talk…’ McGuire’s ‘Here’ curates the long history of events transpiring in one location. Through the
subtle transposition of objects and individuals in a room, the book teaches us that space is defined over time. … Evoking our longing for place, the book performs this cumulative effect for the reader, by layering people, experiences, and events in the context of a single environment. …”

The selection jury had representatives from various Penn State academic departments who use the graphic
 
novel in their teaching or research, as well as representatives with graphic novel expertise from among
Penn State’s alumni and students.

The selection jury for the 2015 prize included Chair, Brandon Hyde, an undergraduate student majoring in English with a longstanding interest in comics and graphic novels; Joel D. Priddy, an associate professor of Graphic Design; Veronica Hicks, a dual PhD candidate in Art Education and Women's Studies; Brent Book, pastor at Zion Lutheran Church, Boalsburg, PA, who received his Liberal Arts baccalaureate degree from Penn State, and maintains a strong interest in the art and structure of storytelling through graphic novels; and Jonathan E. Abel, an assistant professor of Comparative Literature and Japanese.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2016
Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Ellysa Cahoy at ellysa@psu.edu or 814-865-9696 or visit the
Pennsylvania Center for the Book website:

Editor's contact: Lana Munip, assistant editor, Public Relations and Marketing, Penn State University
Libraries. 814-863-4265.

2014 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

Penn State announces winner of the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

University Park, PA--Penn State University Libraries and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book are pleased to announce that “Fran,” by Jim Woodring and published by Fantagraphics Books, has won the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year for 2014.

“Woodring's pen-and-ink technique is staggeringly lush and absorbing, yet he is equally proficient at ordering his panels into sequential art, thus driving his wordless story. These formal elements are critical to the book's episodes of hilariously violent slapstick, distortions of time and space and depictions of a bizarre world vibrating with psychedelic energy. Characters seem like embodied archetypes or allegories of psychological states, expressing themselves through their interactions with the fluid and unpredictable world they inhabit. Hypnotic and subliminal while entertaining and compelling, ‘Fran’s’ dream world is at once familiar and unsettling, a conduit to mental states that, in many ways, only the graphic novel can achieve. Woodring’s work poses a refreshing change from the trend towards wordy graphic memoir, entreating the reader to reckon with a world whose language we cannot capture in our own,” comments the jury.

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to Penn State's University Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels: “Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.”

Sponsored by Penn State's University Libraries and administered by the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or non-fiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. or Canadian citizen or resident. Woodring will receive a cash prize of $2500, the two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America, and a suitable commemorative at a ceremony at Penn State in the fall.
 
The jury also awarded two honor books: “Boxers & Saints,” by Gene Luen Yang and published by First Second Books, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, and “Heck,” by Zander Cannon and published by Top Shelf Productions. Of “Boxers & Saints" the jury says, “In its exploration of the Boxer Rebellion, ‘Boxers & Saints’ works against the serial format so ingrained in the comics tradition. Yang uses each text to refract the other, showing the contradictions and failures of both sides as well as their resonances.” Of “Heck,” the jury says, “It is a thoroughly engaging story despite its seemingly simple presentation. It draws its intellectual inheritance from Dante’s ‘Inferno’ to explore memory, amnesia and morality with grace and wit. Cannon’s style is characterized by deft and confident thick line work combined with dark shadows, creating a stark black and white affair that hides nothing.” 

The selection jury had representatives from various Penn State academic departments who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as representatives with graphic novel expertise from among Penn State’s alumni and students.

The selection jury for the 2014 prize included Chair J. Harlan Ritchey, freelance illustrator, designer, videographer and library assistant, Engineering Library, University Libraries; B. Stephen Carpenter, II, professor of art education and professor in charge of the Art Education Program; Michelle N. Huang, University graduate fellow and Ph.D. candidate, Department of English; Benjamin Schreier, the Malvin and Lea Bank Assistant Professor of English and Jewish Studies and Kaity Watts, senior majoring in English, with emphases in publishing and creative writing, and minoring in world literature.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2015 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Ellysa Cahoy at ellysa@psu.edu or 814-865-9696 or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book website:http://pabook.libraries.psu.edu/activities/ward/index.html

Editor's contact: Catherine Grigor, manager, Public Relations and Marketing, Penn State University Libraries. 814-863-4240,cqg3@psu.edu

2013 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

Penn State announces winner of the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

University Park, PA--Penn State University Libraries and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book are pleased to announce that “Building Stories,” by Chris Ware and published by Pantheon, has won the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year for 2013.

“Ware's astute and precise renderings, composed with a tender yet unblinking clinical eye and fleshed out with pristine and evocative coloring, trace the mundane routines and moments of small crisis that his characters inhabit. In so doing, he produces not a document but a monument, a work whose narrative logic is architectural rather than chronological: a set of lives to be encountered, traversed, and returned to as the rooms and floors of a building might be over the years, still sequentially but not in a limited or decided-upon sequence. Stories, here, are meant not to be told but to be built, explored, inhabited—not merely visited but lived in," observes the award jury.

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to Penn State's University Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels—“Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.” The six books were re-issued in October 2010, by The Library of America in a two-volume boxed set entitled “Lynd Ward: Six Novels in Woodcuts,” the first time this nonprofit publisher included a graphic novelist in its award-winning series.

Sponsored by Penn State's University Libraries and administered by the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or non-fiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. or Canadian citizen or resident. Chris Ware will receive a cash prize of $2500, the two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America, and a suitable commemorative—at a ceremony at Penn State to be scheduled later this year.
 
The jury also awarded two honor books: “Heads or Tails,” by Lilli Carré and published by Fantagraphics Books, and “The Understanding Monster—Book One,” by Theo Ellsworth and published by Secret Acres. Of “Heads or Tails" a juror says, “Each story is exquisitely crafted, demonstrating both a compelling literary style and a rich, engaging design sense that can seem deceptively naïve or childlike on first glance but in context reveals striking sophistication and complexity.” “The Understanding Monster” says a juror,“is an endlessly captivating and rewarding piece of visual and narrative art.”

The selection jury had representatives from various Penn State academic departments who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as representatives with graphic novel expertise from among Penn State’s alumni and students.

The selection jury for the 2013 prize included Chair Adam Haley, Ph.D., lecturer in English, College of the Liberal Arts; Sadie Buckallew, senior majoring in Communication Arts and Sciences, College of the Liberal Arts; Amanda Clossen, learning design librarian, Library Learning Services, University Libraries; Michael Jay Green, M.D., M.S., professor of humanities and medicine, College of Medicine; and J. Jeff Ungar, rare books cataloger, Cataloging and Metadata Services, University Libraries.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2014 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Ellysa Cahoy at ellysa@psu.edu or 814-865-9696 or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book website:http://pabook.libraries.psu.edu/activities/ward/index.html

Editor's contact: Catherine Grigor, manager, Public Relations and Marketing, Penn State University Libraries. 814-863-4240,cqg3@psu.edu

2012 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

Penn State announces winner of the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

University Park, PA--Penn State University Libraries and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book are pleased to announce that “Big Questions” by Anders Nilsen, published by Drawn & Quarterly, has won the Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year. Says one judge, “In its poetic, even elemental grasp of the workings of life at a range of scales, from the molecular to the universal, this comic opens up a potent space for meditation on the human/animal continuum, the origins and meanings of violence, and the inexorable, consoling cycle of life.”

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize honors Ward’s influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to the Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels—“Gods’ Man,” “Madman’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.” The six books were re-issued in October 2010, by The Library of America in a two-volume boxed set entitled “Lynd Ward: Six Novels in Woodcuts,” the first time this nonprofit publisher has included a graphic novelist in its award-winning series.

Sponsored by Penn State University Libraries and administered by the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or non-fiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. citizen or resident. Anders Nilsen will receive a cash prize of $2500, the two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by The Library of America and a suitable commemorative at a ceremony to be held at Penn State later this year.

The jury also awarded four honor books prizes: “Freeway” by Mark Kalesniko, published by Fantagraphics Books; “Habibi” by Craig Thompson, published by Pantheon, an imprint of Random House; “Life With Mr. Dangerous” by Paul Hornschemeier, published by Villard, an imprint of Random House; and  “Zahra’s Paradise” by Amir & Khalil, published by First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishers. 
 
The selection jury for the prize has representatives from various Penn State academic departments who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as representatives with graphic novel expertise from among Penn State’s alumni. The selection jury for 2012 included Chair, Susan Squier, a Julia Greg Brill Professor of Women’s Studies, English, and Science, Technology and Society in the College of the Liberal Arts; Glenn Masuchika, an information literacy librarian in Library Learning Services, University Libraries; Henry Pisciotta, head of the Architecture Library and the assistant head of the Arts and Humanities Library, University Libraries; Esther Prins, an associate professor of education in adult education, in the College of Education, and the co-director of the Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy and the Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy; and John Secreto, owner of Comic Swap, a popular and thriving comics store operating in State College since 1976. 

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2013 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Steven Herb at 814-863-2141 or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book website: http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/activities/ward/index.html.

Editor's contact: Catherine Grigor, manager, Public Relations and Marketing, Penn State University Libraries. 814-863-4240;cqg3@psu.edu

Penn State Announces Winner of the Inaugural Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year

Duncan the Wonder Dog is at once a breath-taking art book, a beautifully rendered comic and a story of the ethics of human relationships with animals. Jurors commented, "I was surprised and astounded at each page: the composition, layout, drawings and writing were so masterfully done, and Hines opens up new possibilities for comics as a creative medium. The content and form of the book are challenging but always rewarding, and the range of compositional techniques are ambitious and innovative. This book presents an experience of reading unlike any I have ever encountered in comics—a visually smart book. The author’s understanding of fine art printmaking, intaglio and lithography, is apparent and his techniques seamlessly recall these traditional forms of printmaking. Each of the 400 pages is a remarkable pastiche of printmaking techniques that are not self conscious nor gimmicky, but purposeful in conveying the sober content of this narrative. Not an easy book—it takes time to absorb the work, but it is time in which to savor the nuances of each page."University Park, PA—Penn State University Libraries and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book are pleased to announce that “Duncan the Wonder Dog” by Adam Hines, published by AdHouse Books, has won the inaugural Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year.

The Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize honors Ward’s seminal influence in the development of the graphic novel and celebrates the gift of an extensive collection of Ward’s wood engravings, original book illustrations and other graphic art donated to the Libraries by his daughters Robin Ward Savage and Nanda Weedon Ward. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward published his six groundbreaking wordless novels—Gods’ ManMadman’s DrumWild Pilgrimage, Prelude to a Million Years, Song without Words, and Vertigo. The six books were re-issued last October by The Library of America in a two-volume boxed set entitled Lynd Ward: Six Novels in Woodcuts, the first time this nonprofit publisher has included a graphic novelist in its award-winning series.

Sponsored by Penn State University Libraries and administered by the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize is presented annually to the best graphic novel, fiction or non-fiction, published in the previous calendar year by a living U.S. citizen or resident. Adam Hines will receive a cash prize of $2500, the two-volume set of Ward’s six novels published by (and thanks to) The Library of America, and a suitable commemorative at a ceremony to be held at Penn State later this year.

The selection jury for the prize has representatives from various Penn State academic departments who use the graphic novel in their teaching or research, as well as representatives with graphic novel expertise from among Penn State’s alumni. The selection jury for 2011 included John Meier, an assistant librarian in the Physical and Mathematical Sciences Library; Jarod Rosello, a cartoonist, writer and doctoral student in curriculum and instruction in the College of Education; Jean Sanders, an associate professor of art in the School of Visual Arts; Scott T. Smith, an assistant professor of English and comparative literature in the College of the Liberal Arts; and Jerry Zolten, an associate professor of communication arts and sciences and American studies at Penn State Altoona.The prize jury also awarded an honor book prize to Drew Weing for Set to Sea, published by Fantagraphics. In this book, small in size but large in vision, the art of storytelling through pure visual image is at its height. Described by jurors as "a small wonder of visual narrative, the book's superbly executed single-panel pages combine iconic cartooning and realistic detail to deliver a quietly moving story that unfolds primarily through image. It epitomizes the whole notion of the graphic novel set forth by Lynd Ward—the illustrations are brilliant and the balance between word and image is spot on. The book encapsulates the power of comics to combine an aesthetic experience with a lovely story with strength and beauty that lies with its simplicity and subtlety.” Weing will accept his honor prize at an event co-sponsored by Penn State and the Pennsylvania Humanities Council at 6 p.m., on May 23, in Foster Auditorium on the Penn State University Park campus.

For more information about the selection criteria and how to submit books for consideration for the 2012 Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize, contact Steven Herb at 814-863-2141 or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book website:http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu/activities/ward/index.html.